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wufpblet yet america's indigent defense systems continue to exist in a state of crisis and the promise of gideon is not being met. [applause] to address this crisis, congress must not only end the forced budget cuts that have decimated public defenders nationwide, they must expand existing indigent defense programs, provide access to council for more juvenile defendants, and increase funding for federal public defender offices. [applause] and every legal professional must answer the a.b.a.'s call to contribute to this cause through pro bono service and help realize the promise of equal justice for all. [applause] as we come together this morning, this same promise must lead us all to acknowledge that although incarceration that is has a significant role to play in our justice system, widespread incarceration at the federal, state, and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable. it imposes a significant economic burden, totaling $80 billion in 2010 alone, and it comes human and moral costs that are impossible to calculate. as a nation, we are goled coldly efficient in our incarc
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
to keep america safe for 7 1/2 years.[applause] and it worked. the record speaks for itself. the cia put out a classified report in 2004. ksm was subjected to enhanced interrogation. a report was published, classified by the cia, and it has been declassified, although it still has parts redacted. the headline is "khalid sheik mohammed preeminent source on al qaeda." that is the place where we learned most of the intelligence we had, at least in the mid part of our time there, about what al qaeda was about, about where they were based, how they were funded, where the training camps were. on 9/11 we did not know that. we knew osama bin laden was in pakistan, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him -- because he was subjected more than anybody else to enhanced interrogation techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense university in may and basically said ok, now we are ret
. they would say, the united states of america are. which signaled that it was not quite holding together. there was a fear it was holding -- going to fall apart. they called it regionalism, and later they call is sectionalism as they head to the civil war. so we know that nation is going to be a strong nation state, it is a democracy, and a two-party system and a strong president. that was none of the things the founders had intended. we look back and see that time as a time of growing pains. and we see dolley madison not knowing how this would end, was the perfect person to ease into the country and twa it was going to be. >> serving as the chief executive of the nation, he brought the real concept of how he wanted the role to be carried out. how did he approach it and how did she help him? >> well, you said "concept," and i think that's perfect, because he was the idea guy. he was very theoretical. he and other members of the founding generation understood as a concept "unit." it was their number one job. how do you do it? how do you bring forth unity? what dolley madison did is take t
, it was important. >> let's take a quick snapshot of that modern republic and just some basic factwhat america looked like in 1790. this was from the first census ever done by the new country, and interestingly the census maker was thomas jefferson. here are some of the facts that they gathered about the new united states. the 13 former colony, now the 13 states, a population of just under 4 million. and 757 of those were blacks, about 19%, and only 9% were free. the per cap that income, $437, now interestingly if you look back before the war it was almost double that. so years of war had reduced the per cap that income. if you translated that to $2,013, $11,500, and the largest cities in the country, new york, philadelphia and boston. what should we learn about those three large cities? >> first of all, let me point out that two of those 13 states were not yet members of the union, the fact is that both north carolina and rhode island held back when the rest of the union adopted the constitution. america was overwhelmingly a rural, rustic agrayingian farm based society. it ended at the appala
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
in america. if you are to use the president's image today, you would quickly get calls from lawyers about doing that. were there any rules whatsoever about the use of the first couples? >> no, and that is why these companies get away with it. several supporters of cleveland in congress were trying to get that type of legislation passed, to not use their image without the way he would veto legislation was to edit it. he had enough detractors that even though they liked frances, they do not want to give them anything he wanted. they could not get these laws passed. >> here is a bit of frances cleveland she had about her frustration. where is this from? >> that was a letter she wrote to the editor of country magazine. he had run an ad for this company. she had become friends and asked him to arrange for that to happen. >> we have to explain how this 49-year-old president and the 21-year-old ride ever became a couple. tell us the story of grover and frances cleveland. >> grover was law partners and friends with frances's father. theveland supposedly gave him first the baby carriage and becam
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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